List of current fields of research

Project Cluster

Steam power plants are known for providing stable and reliable electricity generation from coal. They can run for longer periods to meet the base and medium loads. However, in the future the grid will demand more flexibility when onshore and offshore wind power yields change with the weather. If wind turbines, for example, have to be switched off because of high winds, this loss of energy will need to be dynamically compensated for within a very short period of time. That is why it needs to be known whether future power plants that capture CO2 can also be flexible enough to contribute to a balanced electricity supply. Read more

Project Cluster

A high-temperature heat storage system for combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) plants has been under development since 2009. The integration of such a storage system in the power plant process enables the electricity and heat provision to be decoupled for specific periods. The process therefore enables, for example, the surplus heat produced in addition to customer requirements to be “parked” in the storage system during the day and then made available again at night when the gas turbines are switched off. This form of separation in CCGT plants, which are operated using cogeneration (CHP) and therefore have a high fuel energy utilisation and low CO2 emissions, was previously not possible. Read more

Project Cluster

The amount of fluctuating power generated from wind energy is increasing all the time. Compressed air energy storage can be used to balance the oversupply during periods of strong wind with periods of high demand when winds are weak. A compressed air energy storage facility is a system that can store electrical energy in the short term. It uses excess electricity – on windy days, for example – to produce compressed air and then stores this in a cavern. Read more

Project Cluster

Researchers are developing the so-called pre-combustion process in order to implement climate-friendly coal-fired power plants that use CO2 capture and storage. This process is based on a combined gas and steam turbine process, which is used downstream of a coal gasification process. Read more

Project Cluster

Extensive research work is currently being carried out worldwide that will make it possible to implement technologies for the capture and storage of CO2 (CCS technologies) in the near future. Very prominent networks for the process of scientific dialogue have been put in place alongside national and international research programmes. Read more

Project Cluster

The technologies that appear to be the most promising based on current knowledge have been identified as part of investigations on CO2 REduction TEChnologies (COORETEC) in power plants run on fossil fuels.

With a focus on the processes currently being worked on as part of the COORETEC programme, this research project aims to define uniform or comparable constraint conditions for the realistic calculation of efficiencies for the following processes. Read more

Project Cluster

The permanent, secure geological storage of CO2 fulfils an important function as other technologies will not be available on a large-scale for the foreseeable future. Following on from promising pilot tests on geological storage in saline aquifiers (e.g. in the CO2SINK project in Ketzin), these technologies must now be transferred to larger demonstration systems as the next step. The various separation technologies available result in CO2-rich gases containing various impurities. A detailed understanding of the interactions of the various gases with the ground will play a significant role in the safe storage of CO2 in the long term. Read more

Projects currently being funded